Technical Reference Manual HP x4000 Workstation

HP x4000 Workstation

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E0601

Manufacturing Part Number: A6068-IE001

© Copyright 2001 Hewlett-Packard Company

Notice

The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice.

Hewlett-Packard makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this material, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.

Hewlett-Packard shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for incidental or consequential damages in connection with the furnishing, performance, or use of this material.

Hewlett-Packard assumes no responsibility for the use or reliability of its software on equipment that is not furnished by Hewlett-Packard.

This document contains proprietary information that is protected by copyright. All rights are reserved. No part of this document may be photocopied, reproduced, or translated to another language without the prior written consent of Hewlett-Packard Company.

Adaptec® is a registered trademark of Adaptec, Inc.

Adobe and Acrobat are trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated.

NVIDIA™, GeForce2 GTS™ and Quattro2 MXR™ are registered trademarks or trademarks of NVIDIA Corporation.

Matrox® is a registered trademark of Matrox Electronic Systems Ltd.

Microsoft®, Windows® and MS-DOS® are registered trademarks of the Microsoft Corporation.

Windows NT® is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

Pentium® and AGPset™ are trademarks of Intel Corporation.

WOL™ (Wake on LAN) is a trademark of IBM.

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Contents

1. System Overview

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

HP x4000 Workstation Feature Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

Internal and External Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

HP x4000 Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

Internal Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23

Documentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 HP Web Site Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

2. System Board

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

System Board Component Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 System Board Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Architectural Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

System Chipset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Memory Controller Hub (Intel 860). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 PCI 64-bit Hub (Intel 82086) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Interface Controller Hub (Intel 82801BA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Super I/O Chip (National PC87366) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 LAN Chip (Intel 82550) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 SCSI Controller Chip (LSI SYM43C1010R) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Audio Chip (Analog Devices AD 1885) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Hardware Management Controller Chips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Clocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34

Expansion Card Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) Slot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

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Contents

3. System Memory and Processors

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

System Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Rambus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Eight-RIMM MEC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

4. System BIOS and Resources

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

System BIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 BIOS Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Updating the System BIOS and Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Restoring BIOS Default Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Clearing the CMOS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Recovering the BIOS from the Boot Block. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

HP Setup Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Starting the HP Setup Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Advanced Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Security Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 IPMI Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Power Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Boot Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

BIOS Beep Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

System Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 PCI IRQ Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 IRQ Routing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Interrupt Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 System Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

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I/O Port Map (I/O Addresses Used by the System). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 DMA Channel Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67

5. Hardware Management (Monitoring and Reporting)

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70

General Firmware Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Date/Time Initialization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 SEEPROM Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71

Hardware Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Built-in Self Test (BIST) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Sensor Scan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Fan Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Sense Power State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Chassis Intrusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Pre-boot Device Test. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 PCI/AGP Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76

Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Event Logging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Sensor Report Using IPMI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 System Event Log (SEL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Power Status LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Diag LEDs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 Firmware Failure Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 BIOS is Running OK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 IPMI Platform Event Trap. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78

Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Lock Status Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 BIOS Configuration Tokens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79

6. Power Specifications

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Power Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Power Supply Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Resetting the Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Power Consumption and Cooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

Power Saving and Ergonometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Using Power Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Power Saving Modes and Resume Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

7. Connector Pin-Outs

Expansion Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) Slots. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) Slot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

System Board Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Floppy Disk Drive Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 IDE/ATA 100 Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 SCSI Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Parallel Port Connector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Serial Port Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Keyboard and Mouse Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Universal Serial Bus Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Front Panel Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 ATX Power Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 LAN Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Audio Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 CD Audio In Connector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Microphone Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 System Speaker Connector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Processor Fan Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Chassis Fan Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

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Chassis Intrusion Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119

8. Mechanical Specifications

System Fans and Air Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122

Physical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123

Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124

9. Hardware Components

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126

Graphics Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127 Matrox Millennium G450 Graphics Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127 nVIDIA Quadro2 MXR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131 nVIDIA Quadro2 Pro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132 Fire GL2 and Fire GL4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133

Mass Storage Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136 Flexible Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136 Hard Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136 Optical Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140

Rear Panel Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144

10. Installing or Replacing Parts and Accessories

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146

Cover and Front Bezel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147 Removing the Left Side Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147 Removing the Front Bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149 Replacing the Cover and Front Bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150

Hard Disk Drive Cage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151 Opening the Hard Disk Drive Cage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151

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Closing and Securing the Hard Disk Drive Cage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152

Chassis Beam Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Removing the Chassis Beam Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Installing the Chassis Beam Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155

Memory Expander Card (MEC). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Removing the MEC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Installing the MEC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158

System Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Upgrading Memory on the 8-RIMM MEC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Installing Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161

Graphics Card. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Removing a Graphics Card. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Installing a Graphics Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165

SCSI Hard Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Removing a SCSI Hard Disk Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Setting SCSI IDs for a New Hard Disk Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Installing a SCSI Hard Disk Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172

CD-ROM, CD-RW or DVD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 Determining IDE Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Removing a CD-ROM, CD-RW, or DVD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Installing a CD-ROM, CD-RW or DVD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Load the Software Applications for Your CD-RW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176

Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Removing a Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Installing a Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Updating Your Operating System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181

Floppy Disk Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 Removing the Floppy Disk Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 Installing the Floppy Disk Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

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Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .184 Removing the Power Supply Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .184 Installing the Power Supply Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185

System Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186 Removing the System Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186 Installing the New System Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188

System Board Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191

System Fan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192 Removing the System Fan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192 Installing the System Fan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .193

Fan and Speaker Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194 Removing the Fan and Speaker Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194 Installing the Fan and Speaker Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195

Hard Disk Drive Fan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197 Removing the Hard Disk Drive Fan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197 Installing the Hard Disk Drive Fan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198

Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199 Replacing the System Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199

System Board Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .201

11. Troubleshooting

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204

Solving Hardware Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205 Workstation Does Not Start Properly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205 Keyboard Doesn’t Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206 Monitor Doesn’t Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206 Mouse Doesn’t Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207 Audio Doesn’t Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207

9

Contents

Power LED is Flashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 Hard Disk Drive Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Hard Disk Drive Activity LED Doesn’t Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 CD-ROM, DVD or CD-RW Drive Doesn’t Work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 CD-RW Won’t Allow Recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 DVD Drive Doesn’t Play DVD Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 You Forgot Your Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210

Understanding the Diag LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212

Setting and Removing System Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 Setting Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 Removing Passwords. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224

Using e-Diag Tools for Hardware Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225 Starting e-Diag Tools from the Hard Drive’s Utility Partition (Recommended Method)225

Starting e-Diag Tools from the HP Workstation Recovery CD-ROM 226

Recovering or Reconfiguring Windows 2000 or Windows NT . . . . . . . 227

Preparing to Recover Windows NT or Windows 2000. . . . . . . . . . . . 228

Performing a Full Recovery of Windows NT or Windows 2000 . . . . 229

12. Contacting Support

Online Support for Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232

Documentation Set Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233

Hewlett-Packard Support and Information Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234 Collecting Information Before Contacting HP Support . . . . . . . . . . 234

HP Customer Care Center Phone Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237

10

1  System Overview

Chapter 1  11

System Overview

Overview

Overview

This manual provides detailed system specifications for the HP x4000 Workstation.

This chapter:

Introduces the system’s internal and external features
Lists the system’s specifications and characteristic data
Provides a summary of the available documentation

12  Chapter 1

System Overview

HP x4000 Workstation Feature Set

HP x4000 Workstation Feature Set

The following table provides an overview of the x4000 Workstation feature set.

Feature

Description

System Board

• Eight-layer extended ATX form-factor

Single-sided

Four power/ground layers

Four signal layers

Processor(s)

Intel dp Xeon processors:

• 1.5 GHz, 1.7 GHz, or higher with a quad-pumped 100MHz

Front side bus

• Netburst Microarchitecture with 20-stage instruction pipeline

Chipset

Intel 860 chipset, including:

• Memory Controller Hub (MCH)

• Interface Controller Hub (ICH2)

• PCI 64-bit Hublink (P64H)

Memory Controller

Provides the interface between the front side bus, memory, AGP,

Hub (MCH)

hublink A, and hublink B. It supports:

• One or two Intel Xeon processor(s)

• Dual Rambus channels capable of supporting PC800 RIMMs

• AGP Pro 110 4X graphics with 1.5 V signaling

• 8-bit, 133 MB/s hublink A to ICH2, which bridges to the 33

MHz PCI bus

• 16-bit, 266 MB/s hublink B to P64H, which bridges to the 66

MHz PCI bus

Chapter 1  13

System Overview

HP x4000 Workstation Feature Set

Feature

Description

Rambus Memory on

Plugs into the system board and supports:

Memory Expander

• 400 MHz operation delivering up to 3.2 GB/s memory

Card (MEC)

bandwidth using two expansion channels operating in lock step

• Up to 8 PC800 RIMMs (see “Upgrading Memory on the

8-RIMM MEC” on page 159 for memory loading instructions)

P64H Hub to 64-bit

Supports 64-bit, 66 MHz PCI bus containing:

PCI module

• Two 64-bit, Two PCI connectors 66 MHz PCI connectors

• On-board SCSI controller

Interface Controller

ICH2 Hublink to I/O controller modules supports:

Hub

• Three 32-bit, 33 MHz PCI connectors

• Two external USB ports

• Two ATA 100 IDE controllers

• One firmware hub interface

• One AC97 audio interface

BIOS

Based on Phoenix core, including 4 MB flash.

Accessory Card Slots

• One AGP Pro 110 4X connector

• Three 5V, 33 MHz, 32-bit Peripheral Component Interconnect

(PCI) connectors

• Two 3.3V, 66 MHz, 64-bit PCI connectors

LAN Port

The Intel 82550 10/100BaseT LAN port interfaces to the system

via the 33 MHz, 32-bit PCI bus. Wake on LAN is supported.

On-board SCSI

The LSI SYM43C1010R has two Ultra 160 SCSI controllers to

Controller Chip

support two internal wide connectors:

• Ribbon cable up to SCSI drives

• Ribbon cable to external SCSI connector

14  Chapter 1

System Overview

HP x4000 Workstation Feature Set

Feature

Description

Super I/O Chip

The Nation PC87366 chip supports:

• Two 9-pin, RS-232 serial ports

• One ECP/EPP parallel port

• One IDE floppy controller

PS2 Keyboard

PS2 Mouse

IDE/ATA Controllers

Primary and secondary IDE controllers upport DMA transfers for

up to four devices.

Hardware

Qlogic Zircon Lite micro-controller with Winbond W83782D

Management

auxiliary chip

Controller

• Monitors systems components via the SMBUS.

• Reports errors to the Diag LED lights on the control panel.

Operating System

All models come preloaded with Windows 2000 Professional, and

include Windows 2000 and NT 4.0 recovery and installation

CD-ROMs.

Mass Storage

Seven bays, supporting:

• Two front-access, 3 .5inch, 1 inch floppy drive bays (one factory

installed drive)

• Three front-access, 5.25 -inch half-height drive bays (up to 2

factory installed optical drives, not for use with hard disk

drives)

• Two internal 3.5-inch, 1-inch height hard disk drive bays (up to

2 factory installed drives).

Optical Drives

Models include one or two of the following:

• IDE 48X CD-ROM

12X CD-RW

12X DVD

Chapter 1  15

System Overview

HP x4000 Workstation Feature Set

Feature

Description

Audio

On-board audio is provided by an Analog Devices AD1885 CODEC

(AC97) and supports three rear panel jacks for:

• Headphone/Line out (output) on the rear panel

• Line-in (input) on the rear panel

• Microphone (input) on the rear panel

• CDROM (input) on the system board

• Internal speaker (output) on the system board

System Board

CD audio in

Connectors (Internal)

System speaker

Front panel

2 CPU fans

3 Chassis fans

Chassis intrusion

IDE floppy controller

• 2 IDE controllers (primary and secondary)

2 ATX Power

• AGP Pro 110 4X (graphics)

3 PCI 32-bit

2 PCI 64-bit

• 2 SCSI (both are internal wide connectors on the system board,

but one has a ribbon cable attached to an external SCSI

connector on the rear panel)

16  Chapter 1

System Overview

HP x4000 Workstation Feature Set

Feature

Description

Rear Panel

SCSI Ultra Wide

Connectors

PS2 Mouse

(External)

PS2 Keyboard

25-pin parallel

• 9-pin serial (two, buffered)

Dual USB connectors

LAN

Audio:

— Input Line jack (3.5 mm)

— Output Line jack (3.5 mm)

— Microphone jack (3.5 mm)

Chapter 1  17

System Overview

Internal and External Components

Internal and External Components

Figure 1-1, Figure 1-2, and Figure 1-3 and show the front, side, and rear views of the HP x4000 Workstation.

Figure 1-1  Front View

Front access bays:

image5

– three 5 1/4-inch drive bays (used for optical drives)

– two 3 1/2-inch bays, including a 1.44MB floppy disk drive

Control Panel

18  Chapter 1

System Overview

Internal and External Components

Figure 1-2  Side View with Cover Removed

image6

Power Supply

Spare mounting rails:

– Narrow green rails for 5.25-inch

Rear Chassis

– Wide black rails

Fan

for 3.5-inch

Chassis Beam Assembly

Hard Disk Drive Cage (holds two hard disk drives)

Chapter 1  19

System Overview

Internal and External Components

Figure 1-3  Rear View

image7

Power

HP Master Key

Lock

SCSI

Mouse

Keyboard

Dual USB

Serial port A

Parallel port

Serial port B image8

LAN image9

Line Out(headphone)image10image11

Line In

Microphone

Monitor

20  Chapter 1

CAUTION

System Overview

HP x4000 Control Panel

HP x4000 Control Panel

The Workstation’s control panel shown in Figure 1-4 has the following features:

Power On/Off button: Press to start the Workstation. You can wake the Workstation from Hibernate or Stand By mode by pressing this button for less than four seconds. For more information about these modes, see “Using Power Management” on page 89.

Always power off through the operating system. Do not power off using the power button or reset button except during extreme circumstances when the system will not shut down through the operating system. Using the power button or reset button to power down may cause you to lose unsaved data from open applications.

In the event that the operating system has hung and will not shut down, pressing the power button for five seconds is equivalent to pulling the power plug.

Power LED:

— Solid green indicates system on.

— Solid yellow indicates the Workstation is in Stand By or Hibernate mode. See “Power Saving and Ergonometry” on page 89.

— Flashing yellow, flashing red, or solid red indicates a system error. See “Understanding the Diag LEDs” on page 212.

Reset button: Press to reinitialize all the hardware without cycling power to the system. Avoid general use of this button because file damage may occur.
Hard Disk Activity LED: Flickers when your hard disk is being accessed.
Network Activity LED: Flickers when network activity is taking place This occurs even when the Workstation is in a power-off state, provided Wake-on-LAN is not enabled and both the network and power cables are plugged in.

Chapter 1  21

System Overview

HP x4000 Control Panel

Diag LEDs: These four LEDs can be off, green, yellow, or red. The color pattern lets you diagnose problems with your Workstation. For more information, see “Understanding the Diag LEDs” on page 212.

Figure 1-4

Control Panel

Power On/Off

Hard Disk

and Power LED

Activity LED

Network

Activity LED

Reset Button

Diag LEDs

image12

22  Chapter 1

System Overview

Internal Features

Internal Features

The core architecture of the HP x4000 Workstation consists of:

Intel 860 Memory Controller Hub (MCH)
Input/Output Controller Hub (ICH2)
PCI 64-bit Hub (P64H)
400 MHz (quad-pumped and 100MHz) front side bus and dp Xeon processors
400 MHz Rambus (PC800)
AGP Pro 110 4X

For information about…

Refer to…

System board components

Chapter 2

Memory Expander Card (MEC)

Chapter 3

Hardware management (monitoring and reporting)

Chapter 5

Mechanical specifications

Chapter 8

Graphics cards

Chapter 9

Power supply and power requirements

Chapter 6

Mass storage devices

Chapter 9

System HP BIOS

Chapter 4

Tests and error messages

Chapter 11

Connector pin-outs and sockets

Chapter 7

Installing or replacing parts and accessories

Chapter 10

Troubleshooting

Chapter 11

Contacting support

Chapter 12

Chapter 1  23

System Overview

Documentation

Documentation

The following table lists the documentation available for the HP x4000 Workstation. The printed documents were packaged with your Workstation. Some of the documents are available in PDF format at www.hp.com/workstations/support.

Title

Printed?

Part Numbers

HP x4000 Workstation

Yes and

A6068-90001

Installation Poster

web

HP x4000 Workstation

Yes and

A6068-90000

Getting Started Guide

web

HP x4000 Workstation

No

web accessible only

Technical Reference

Manual

HP x4000 Workstation

No

web accessible only

Service Handbook

HP Web Site Contents

You can obtain additional online support documentation, BIOS upgrades,

and drivers from www.hp.com/workstations/support.

24  Chapter 1

2  System Board

Chapter 2  25

System Board

Overview

Overview

The following sections describe the system board:

“System Board Component Layout” on page 27
“System Chipset” on page 30
“Expansion Card Slots” on page 35

Figure 2-1 shows the x4000 Workstation system board:

Figure 2-1  x4000 Workstation System Board

CPU 0 Socket

CPU 1 Socket

image13 Internal SCSI

image14

External SCSI

MEC Connector

Up to six accessory cards can be installed:

image15 Two 64-bit PCI slots

image16 Three 32-bit PCI slots

image17 One AGP Pro 110 4X

slot (graphics)

Primary IDE Controller

Secondary IDE Controller

Floppy Disk Drive Controller

26  Chapter 2

System Board

System Board Component Layout

System Board Component Layout

Figure 2-2 shows where the chips and connectors reside on the system board.

Figure 2-2  System Board Diagram

image18

Chapter 2  27

System Board

System Board Component Layout

System Board Switches

The system board includes a 4-pole DIP switch (shown in Figure 2-2), which lets you configure BIOS functions. Because the switches are read only at system start up, you must change the switch positions when the Workstation is shut down.

Switch

Function

Default

Comment

1

Clear BIOS

Off

Clears both Administrator and User

password

passwords, if they have been set.

2

Boot block

Off

Forces a boot block recovery from a

recovery

bootable BIOS flash disk in the floppy

disk drive.

3

Clear CMOS

Off

Reset CMOS settings to BIOS defaults.

You can also do this with the F9 key in

the Setup program as described in

“Clearing the CMOS” on page 46.

4

Enable safe mode

Off

Force processors to run at 800 MHz. This

can be used as a troubleshooting tool or

to correct a problem after adding a

second processor. Before using this, flash

the BIOS as described at

www.hp.com/workstations/support. Use

this switch as a last resort. If it gets the

system running, replace the processors.

If the problem persists, replace the

system board.

Architectural Diagram

Figure 2-3 enumerates the x4000 system board features:

1.One or two dp Xeon processors
2.Intel 860 memory controller hub (MCH)
3.Memory expansion card
4.Intel 82806 PCI 64-bit Hub (P64H) connected to 16-bit Hublink B
5.Intel 82801BA interface controller hub (ICH2) connected to 8-bit Hublink A

28  Chapter 2

System Board

System Board Component Layout

6.Two 3.3V, 66 MHz, 64-bit PCI slots
7.Three 5V, 33 MHz, 32-bit PCI slots
8.One 1.5 V signaling level AGP Pro 110 4X slot
9.National PC87366 Super I/P with connections to: -floppy device

-two 9-pin RS232 connectors serial ports -25-pin ECP/EPP parallel port

-PS2 mouse

-PS2 keyboard

10.Analog Devices AD1885 Codec (AC97) audio
11.Intel 82550 10/100 LAN port
12.LSI SYM53C1010R two Ultra160 SCSI controller
13.Zircon Lite hardware management controller
14.Winbond W83782D hardware monitoring ASIC

Figure 2-3  System Board Architectural Diagram

image19

Chapter 2  29

System Board

System Chipset

System Chipset

Memory Controller Hub (Intel 860)

The MCH supports:

The 400 MHz (quad-pumped 100MHz) front side bus for up to two Intel dp Xeon processors
Two Rambus channels with up to 8 PC800 ECC RIMMs total
An Accelerated Graphics Port, AGP Pro 110 4x with 1.5V signaling only.
Two source-synchronous, enhanced, Hublink buses:

— Hublink A is an 8-bit, 133 MB/s connection to the ICH2

— Hublink B is a 16-bit, 266 MB/s bus to the P64H

PCI 64-bit Hub (Intel 82086)

P64H provides the interface to the 64-bit, 66 MHz PCI bus with embedded SCSI controller chip and two 3.3 V PCI slots.

When 33 MHz cards are present, the P64H detects this condition and lowers the bus frequency to 33 MHz. Only 3.3 V cards can be used.

Interface Controller Hub (Intel 82801BA)

The ICH2 is the interface to:

a 32-bit, 33 MHz PCI bus with embedded LAN and three 5 V PCI slots
Two ATA100 IDE Controllers, which support DMA transfers rates for up to four devices

The IDE/ATA interface on the x4000 is provided primarily for use with optical devices

30  Chapter 2

System Board

System Chipset

NOTE

The x4000 Workstation is optimized for use with SCSI hard disk

drives. IDE hard disk drives are not tested or recommended in the

x4000.

Two external USB ports which are USB 1.1 compliant ports with over-current protection and support for wake up from S1 (sleep) state (USB mouse and keyboard are not supported).
Audio
Super I/0
SMBUS

Super I/O Chip (National PC87366)

The Super I/O provides the interface to:

Two serial ports (A and B). The serial port interface voltage levels are established by DS14185A communication port interface chips.
One EPP parallel port
Floppy disk drive
PS2 Keyboard
PS2 Mouse

LAN Chip (Intel 82550)

The LAN chip:

Is 10/100 Base T
Is IEEE 802.3 compliant
Is on the 33 MHz, 32-bit PCI bus
Supports Wake-on-LAN via the PME# signal
Stores configuration information on attached SEEPROM chip

Chapter 2  31

System Board

System Chipset

SCSI Controller Chip (LSI SYM43C1010R)

The SCSI chip is a 64 bit/66 MHz PCI DMA bus master device. It includes 2 Ultra160 SCSI controllers, each with it’s own independent channel. One channel is connected via ribbon cable to up to two internal SCSI devices. The other channel is routed to a back-panel connector to support external devices

SCSI features:

Double Transition (DT) clocking. DT Clocking permits data transfer up to 160 MB/s on each channel, for a total of 320 MB/s
Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC). CRC improves the integrity of the SCSI data transmission through enhanced detection of communication errors. This is augmented with Asynchronous Information Protection to provide complete end-to-end protection of the SCSI I/O.
Domain Validation. SureLink Domain Validation automatically tests and adjusts the SCSI transfer rate to ensure data integrity at the fastest speed.
LVD and Single-ended (SE) transfers. If an SE device is connected, the channel it is connected to operates as an SE bus.
PCI 2.2 compliant

32  Chapter 2

System Board

System Chipset

Audio Chip (Analog Devices AD 1885)

The on-board audio is provided by an Analog Devices AD1885 CODEC (AC97). The audio connections are:

headphone/lineout output (external)
line-in input (external)
microphone input (external)
CD-ROM input (internal)
internal speaker output (internal)

The output to the internal speaker is amplified via an LM4871 audio amplifier to provide the power level needed by the speaker.

A voltage regulator is used to provide a clean +5 volt supply for the CODEC’s analog section, the internal speaker amplifier, and the microphone bias supply.

The jacksense1 input of the CODEC is used to switch the audio output from the internal speaker to the headphone/lineout jack when a cable is plugged in the jack (this includes the keyboard’s audio pass-through cable).

Voltage dividers are provided on the line-in and CD-ROM inputs to meet PC99 specification requirements.

Hardware Management Controller Chips

The x4000 Workstation is monitored and managed by two chips on the SMBUS;

The Qlogic Zircon Lite micro-controller drives the Diag LEDs and the Power Button LED on the control panel.
The Winbond WB782D ASIC monitors voltage levels and control fans.
The SMBUS is a low frequency bus that communicates system state and error information among integrated circuits..

Chapter 2  33

System Board

System Chipset

Clocks

Table 2-1 describes the clocks used in the x4000 Workstation.

Table 2-1

Clocks

Name

Description

System

A CK00-compliant clock synthesizer in a single

CKx_SKS clock chip creates the main system clocks

using a 14.318 MHz parallel mode crystal reference.

Memory

Two Direct Rambus Clock Generator (DRCG) chips

provide the clocks for the expansion channels to the

Memory Expansion Card (MEC). Using the 50 MHz

reference clock provided by the system clock

generator, each DRCG produces the 400 MHz

differential clock needed by the memory expansion

channel. The Memory Controller Hub (MCH)

provides two pairs of feedback signals to the DRCGs

to keep the Host and RDRAM clocks aligned.

Real Time

A 32.768 KHz parallel mode crystal is the reference

Clock (RTC)

for the ICH2 real-time clock circuitry.

Audio

A 24.576 MHz parallel mode crystal is the reference

for the Audio Codec.

Local Area

A 25 MHz parallel mode crystal provides a

Network (LAN)

frequency reference for the 82550’s internal

oscillator.

SCSI

A 40 MHz oscillator provides the SCSI controller

SCLK.

Zircon

A 10 MHz oscillator clocks the Zircon chip.

34  Chapter 2

NOTE

System Board

Expansion Card Slots

Expansion Card Slots

The x4000 expansion card slots are described in the following sections:

“Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) Slots” on page 35
“Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) Slot” on page 36
“System Memory and Processors” on page 37

Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) Slots

The x4000 system board has five PCI slots available:

Three 5 V, 33 MHz, 32-bit slots
Two 3.3 V, 66 MHz, 64-bit slots

Cards requiring 5 V must go in the 32-bit slots. Cards requiring 3.3 V must go in the 64-bit slots. Universal cards, which use either voltage, can be placed in either slot, but can only function at 66 MHz in the 64-bit slots.

The total power consumption across all used PCI slots depends on what type of AGP graphics card is installed. When there is an AGP Pro 50 card, the maximum is 80W total across all PCI slots. When there is an AGP Pro 110 card, the maximum is 45W. The power consumption must comply with the electrical specifications of the PCI 2.2 specification.

Table 7-1 on page 94 describes the PCI 33 MHz, 32-bit connector. Table 7-2 on page 97 describes the PCI 66 MHz, 64-bit connector.

Chapter 2  35

System Board

Expansion Card Slots

Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) Slot

The 1.5 V, AGP Pro 110 4X slot provides graphics performance for high-end graphics cards, combining AGP 4X bandwidth (data transfer rates as fast as 1056 MB/sec) with the ability to accept high-end graphics cards drawing up to 110 W of power.

To accommodate AGP Pro cards, the AGP Pro 110 4X slot connector is wider than the standard AGP 4X connector. To meet the increased power requirements of AGP Pro graphics cards, additional pins are present at both ends of the connector.

An AGP Pro card may draw power either from the existing part of the AGP Pro 110 4X connector, the extended part, or a combination of the two. In all cases, the maximum power that an AGP Pro card may draw is limited to 110 W in the Workstation models. Power on the existing part of the connector is delivered on 5.0 V and 3.3 V rails. Power on the extension is delivered on the 12 V and 3.3 V rails.

You can use either standard AGP graphics cards or AGP Pro graphics cards that draw less than 110 W of power. Power is provided through 3.3 V, 5 V, or 12 V power rails.

CAUTION  Do not use AGP Pro cards that draw more than 110 W or 3.3 V.

The AGP Pro 110 4X slot is backward compatible with both AGP 1x and 2.x modes (using 1.5 V signalling) and AGP 4x mode (where 1.5 V signalling is necessary).

Table 7-3 on page 102 describes the AGP Pro 110 4X connector.

36  Chapter 2

3  System Memory and Processors

Chapter 3  37

System Memory and Processors

Overview

Overview

This chapter contains information on the x4000:

“System Memory” on page 39
“Processor” on page 41

38  Chapter 3

System Memory and Processors

System Memory

System Memory

The main memory for the x4000 Workstation is not located on the system board. Instead, a Memory Expander Card (MEC) plugs into the system board and contains up to eight memory modules. PC800 Rambus In-Line Memory Modules (RIMMs) with Error Correction Code (ECC) are installed on the MEC in pairs.

Rambus

The layout of RDRAM channels on the MEC follows Rambus recommendations that minimize trace noise. This puts pair members diagonal to each other on the MEC. RDRAM achieves high speed transmission through a combination of techniques:

dense packaging
high quality transmission lines
topology

The MEC RIMMs must be loaded in a specific order. Memory loading rules are explained in “Upgrading Memory on the 8-RIMM MEC” on page 159.

Each direct RDRAM channel contains two RIMM slots and is terminated at the end opposite from the memory controller. If only one RIMM is in the channel then the other slot must be filled with a Continuity RIMM (CRIMM) in order to allow a continuous path from the controller, through both slots, to the hard-wired terminator at the other end.

Eight-RIMM MEC

The eight-RIMM MEC can have the voltage refulator hardwaired on the MEC or it may have the removable module (VRM). The MEC shown in Figure 3-1 has a VRM slot.

Chapter 3  39

System Memory and Processors

System Memory

Figure 3-1

x4000 8-RIMM Memory Expander Card

2A (J6)

1A (J5)

4B (J4)

4A (J8)

3B (J3)

image20

3A (J7)

2B (J2)

1B (J1)

The eight-RIMM MEC uses two memory repeater hubs for RDRAM (MRH-R). Each MRH-R supports two Direct RDRAM channels with two RIMMs per channel. The Memory Controller Hub (MCH) interfaces to the MEC using an expansion channel for each MRH-R. The MEC supports 400 MHz operation delivering up to 3.2 GB/s memory bandwidth using two expansion channels operating in lock step. The expansion channel is a super set of the Direct RDRAM channel using an additional two Rambus Signaling Levels (RSL) to communicate channel and control information from the MCH to the MRH-R. The RDRAM memory interface can achieve greater than 95% use of the maximum bandwidth.

40  Chapter 3

System Memory and Processors

Processor

Processor

The x4000 supports up to two Intel dp Xeon processors on a 400 MHz front side bus (quad-pumped 100 MHz frequency). Xeon processor features include:

L1 and L2 cache on die
L2 is 256 KB 8-way set associative
NetBurst MicroArchitecture with 20-stage instruction pipeline

Chapter 3  41

System Memory and Processors

Processor

42  Chapter 3

4  System BIOS and Resources

Chapter 4  43

System BIOS and Resources

Overview

Overview

This chapter contains information on:

“System BIOS” on page 45
“HP Setup Program” on page 49
“BIOS Beep Codes” on page 59
“System Resources” on page 60

44  Chapter 4

System BIOS and Resources

System BIOS

System BIOS

The HP x4000 Workstation BIOS is based on a Phoenix BIOS and is compliant with:

ACPI 1.0
PCI 2.2
PnP 1.0a
DMI 2.0
WFM 2.0
MPS 1.4
PC 99 (fast boot)

The BIOS supports:

up to six processor microcodes
boot block recovery mode
administrator and user passwords
configuration summary screen
setup program
temporary boot priority
fast boot
POST routines

The system ROM contains the Power-On Self-Test (POST) routines and the BIOS: the system BIOS, video BIOS, and low-option ROM. This chapter gives an overview of the following:

Menu-driven Setup with context-sensitive help.
POST routines, which are a sequence of tests the computer performs to ensure that the system is functioning correctly

BIOS Identification

The system BIOS is identified by the version number XX.YM.mm, where:

XX is a two-letter code indicating the system
Y is a one-letter code indicating the HP entity
M is the major BIOS version
mm is the minor BIOS version

Chapter 4  45

System BIOS and Resources

System BIOS

Updating the System BIOS and Firmware

You can download the latest system BIOS and firmware for the HP

x4000 workstations from HP’s Web site at

www.hp.com/workstations/support

Instructions for downloading and updating the BIOS and firmware are

posted on the download site and are included as a text file in the

downloadable file.

Don’t turn off the computer until the system BIOS and firmware update

CAUTION

procedure has completed. Otherwise, irrecoverable damage to the ROM

might occur. If the power fails during the BIOS fash you may be able to

restore the previous BIOS from the boot black. See “Recovering the BIOS

from the Boot Block” on page

NOTE

Restoring BIOS Default Settings

BIOS and configuration issues may cause suspected hardware errors. If the BIOS settings are wrong, perform the following steps to restore the BIOS to its default setting:

1.To access the Setup program, press F2 while the initial HP logo displays immediately after restarting the workstation.
2.Press F9 to load the default settings from the Setup program.
3.In the main menu, set the Reset Configuration Data to Yes.

Take note of the current settings in the system setup utility before you make any modifications to the BIOS.

Clearing the CMOS

To clear the CMOS:

1.Turn off the Workstation, disconnect the power cord and all cables, then remove the cover.

46  Chapter 4

System BIOS and Resources

System BIOS

2.Set system board switch 3 to ON. See “System Board Switches” on page 28.
3.Replace the cover, and reconnect the power cord and display cable.
4.Restart the Workstation. A message similar to the following appears:

Configuration has been cleared, switch “Clear Configuration” to OFF position before rebooting.

5.Turn off the Workstation, disconnect the power cord and display cables, and remove the cover. (You must press the power button for 5 seconds to get the system to power down.)
6.Set system board switch 3 to OFF.
7.Replace the cover, and reconnect the power cord and data cables.
8.Turn on the Workstation.
9.When prompted, press F2 to run Setup. See “Starting the HP Setup Program” on page 49 for more information about the Setup program.
10.Press F9. The system automatically downloads and saves the CMOS default values.
11.Exit Setup and save the new configuration.

Recovering the BIOS from the Boot Block

If you can’t ue the standard BIOS flash, the BIOS could be corrupted and unable to boot. You may be able to recover the BIOS from the BOot Block on the system board..

1.Obtain a bootable DOS floppy disk.
2.Copy the BIOS files onto the floppy disk. For information about how to download the system BIOS, see “Updating the System BIOS and Firmware” on page 46.
3.Create (or edit) the autoexec.bat file, which should contain the following line of text:

phlash16 /c /mode=3 /s <BIOS filename>.wph

(Rename the BIOS filename with the filename on the floppy disk.)

4.Turn off the Workstation, disconnect the power cord, and remove the cover.

Chapter 4  47

System BIOS and Resources

System BIOS

5.Set switch 2 on the system board to ON. See “System Board Switches” on page 28.
6.Insert the floppy disk into the floppy disk drive.
7.Reconnect the power cord, and turn on the Workstation.
8.The workstation boots from the floppy disk, then flashes the BIOS. During the flash process, the screen remains blank. When you hear one long beep, the recovery process is finished.
9.Turn off the Workstation. Remove the floppy disk from the drive. Remove the power cord and display cables, and remove the cover. (You must press the pwoer buttong for 5 seconds to get the system to power down.)
10.Set switch 2 back to OFF.
11.Replace the cover, reconnect the power cord, and reboot the Workstation.

48  Chapter 4

System BIOS and Resources

HP Setup Program

HP Setup Program

The HP Setup program lets you configure your Workstation. You can:

set up the system Administrator and User passwords
change the system boot order
solve configuration problems

HP recommends you note any changes you make to the system setup for later reference.

Starting the HP Setup Program

To start the Setup program:

1.Start your Workstation. If your Workstation is already up, shut it down and restart.
2.Press F2 while F2 Setup is displayed at the bottom of the screen.

If you fail to press F2 in time and the start-up process continues, you must allow your system to finish booting up, then restart your Workstation and go through the POST again.

The opening screen of the Workstation’s Setup program is displayed:

A band along the bottom of the screen gives instructions on using the keyboard-driven menus:

F1: Help

F7/F8: Change value

F9: Return to system configuration to default

F10: Return to previous value

— Up/Down arrow keys: Highlight an item or menu

Enter: Select an item or menu

Esc: Exit

Chapter 4  49

System BIOS and Resources

HP Setup Program

A band along the top displays the menus. For more information on the menus, see:

— “Main Menu” on page 51

— “Advanced Menu” on page 52

— “Security Menu” on page 55

— “IPMI Menu” on page 56

— “Boot Menu” on page 57

— “Power Menu” on page 57

50  Chapter 4

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HP Setup Program

Main Menu

Table 4-1 describes the functions available in the Setup program Main menu.

Table 4-1

Main Menu

Field

Description

BIOS Version

This field is view-only. It displays your current BIOS

version. You can compare this to the most recent

available BIOS located at

www.hp.com/workstations/support.

Operating

This field indicates the currently selected operating

System

system. The BIOS needs this information to

understand how to handle Plug-and-Play

configuration and Quick Boot. If you are using

different operating systems and don’t want to modify

this field every time you run a different one, select

the default Other option.

Reset

When you reset configuration data, the BIOS

Configuration

dynamically reallocates resources (IRQs, I/O,

Data

memory) to cards and motherboard devices at the

next boot. It then sets this field back to No. You

would not select Yes and choose to reset your

configuration data unless you were having problems

with your Workstation.

System Time

The system time format is based on a 24-hour clock.

Numlock at

Use this field to specify whether the number keys on

Power-On

the number keypad are enabled when your computer

starts. Otherwise, the number keypad keys act as

cursor control keys.

System Date

The system date format is mm/dd/yyyy.

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HP Setup Program

Advanced Menu

Table 4-2 describes the submenus available in the Setup program Advanced menu.

Table 4-2

Advanced Menu

Field

Description

Processors

Displays the type and the speed of the processor(s)

you have in your Workstation. You can change your

processor speed in the Processor Speed field by

selecting a value from the drop down menu. Your

processor cannot run any faster than what is

displayed in the Current Type field. If you leave

Processor Speed set to the default of Auto, the

processor speed is automatically detected. Use a

fixed frequency for troubleshooting only.

Chipset

Memory Error Checking: You can choose between

ECC and Disabled. ECC scrubbing checks for and

corrects errors at the source to prevent them from

reoccurring. Change this field to Disabled if you want

to find errors, but don’t want them corrected.

ECC Error Type: When an ECC error occurs, it

generates an interrupt. In this field, you can select

the type of interrupt you want reported: NMI

(Non-Maskable), SMI (System Management), SCI,

(System Control), or None.

SERR signal condition: In this field, you can select

the type of ECC error condition that triggers a

critical system error (SERR#). Normally, only Multiple

bit (unrecoverable) errors should be able to trigger

SERR#. But you can also choose Single bit, None, or

Both.

Floppy Disk

Contains the floppy disk drive type and controller

Drive

fields. If you choose to disable your floppy disk drive,

you must also disable your floppy disk controller.

IDE Devices

Lets you configure the settings for the IDE controller

and any attached IDE devices.

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HP Setup Program

Table 4-2

Advanced Menu

Field

Description

Integrated

Lets you configure the settings for the SCSI

SCSI

controller and any attached SCSI devices.

Controller

Integrated SCSI: The integrated SCSI ASIC has two

controllers and this enables or disables both at the

same time. You cannot disable just one SCSI

controller.

Option ROM Scan: Enable this option if the SCSI

device is used to boot the operating system. If too

many option ROMs are enabled, some may not load

due to insufficient available shadow memory. Always

disable any that aren’t needed.

Enable Master: The BIOS normally leaves Bus

Mastering disabled, and the Operating System

enables it when starting. Set this field to Enabled if

you have a bus-mastering device and the device

driver cannot enable bus mastering by itself.

Latency Timer: This field sets the minimum

guaranteed time slice allotted for bus master,

expressed in PCI bus clock cycles. The bigger the

value, the greater the share of the bus to the device.

Integrated

Lets you configure the settings for the integrated

Network

10/100BT network interface. These fields are

Interface

identical to the Integrated SCSI Controller fields

listed above.

Integrated

Lets you configure the settings for the integrated

USB

USB interface. These fields are identical to the

Integrated SCSI Controller fields listed above except

there is no Option ROM Scan.

Chapter 4  53

System BIOS and Resources

HP Setup Program

Table 4-2

Advanced Menu

Field

Description

Integrated I/O

Lets you configure both the integrated serial and

Ports

parallel ports.

Serial port A, Serial port B, or Parallel Port: These

fields contain three choices. Auto lets the BIOS or a

PnP OS configure the port. Enabled lets you set each

resource. Disabled leaves the port disabled by the

BIOS, but a PnP OS can still enable it.

Parallel Port Mode: You can set the parallel port

mode to Output only, Bi-directional, EPP, or ECP.

Integrated

Lets you configure the integrated PCI audio

Audio

controller. These fields are identical to the Integrated

SCSI Controller fields listed above except there is no

Option ROM Scan.

AGP Pro 110

Lets you configure your AGP Pro 110 4X slot. The

4X Slot

first two fields describe the installed graphics card.

(Graphics)

The Enable Master and Latency Timer fields are

described in the Integrated SCSI Controller entry

above.

Graphics Aperture: This field contains a pull-down

menu that lets you choose the size of the graphics

aperture for the AGP video device.

PCI Device

Lets you configure a PCI device plugged into the

Slot #

specified slot. The first two fields describe the

installed PCI card. The next three fields are identical

to the Integrated SCSI Controller fields listed above.

54  Chapter 4

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HP Setup Program

Security Menu

Table 4-3 describes the fields available in the Setup program Security menu.

Table 4-3

Security Menu

Field

Description

Administrator

This field is view-only. It tells you whether there is

Password

an Administrator password set.

Set

This password prevents unauthorized access to this

Administrator

your Workstations Setup program. This password

Password

can also be used to start the computer when the

power-on password is Enabled. You must set an

administrator password before you can set a user

password.

Clear All

Selecting this field and pressing Enter clears both the

Passwords

User and Administrator passwords.

User

This field is view-only. It tells you whether there is a

Password

User password set.

Set User

If an administrator password has been set, you can

Password

enter this field to set a user password. The User

password prevents unauthorized access to this your

Workstations Setup program. This password can also

be used to start the computer when the power-on

password is Enabled.

Power-On

If Enabled, you must enter a password before the

Password

Workstation boots. You can only enable this field if

an administrator password has been set.

Start from

If Disabled, unauthorized use of the floppy disk drive

Floppy

to start the computer is prevented. (The drive is still

available for reading and writing data.)

Start from

If Disabled, unauthorized use of the CD-ROM to start

CD-ROM

the computer is prevented. (The drive is still

available for reading data.)

Chapter 4  55

System BIOS and Resources

HP Setup Program

Table 4-3

Security Menu

Field

Description

Start from

If Disabled, unauthorized use of the hard disk drive

Hard Disk

to start the computer is prevented. (The drive is still

Drive

available for reading and writing data.)

Write on

If Locked, users are prevented from copying

Floppy Disks

information to a diskette.

Locked Setup

If Locked, a Plug-and-Play operating system cannot

Configuration

change the BIOS configuration settings.

Hard Disk

If Locked, the boot sector on the hard disk drive is

Boot Sector

protected against viruses.

IPMI Menu

This menu contains one field that lets you choose to force the BIOS to clear the System Event log.

56  Chapter 4

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HP Setup Program

Power Menu

Table 4-4 describes the functions available in the Setup program Power menu.

Table 4-4

Power Menu

Field

Description

Remote

Lets you enable remote power-on (wake-up) from

Power-On

devices and operating systems that support this

feature.

After Power

If you experience a power failure, the setting for this

Failure

field determines the state the Workstation returns to

when power is restored. Power On turns the

Workstation back on. Stay Off leaves the Workstation

off and disables remote power-on. Last State restores

the state the Workstation was in when the power

failed.

Boot Menu

Table 4-5 describes the functions available in the Setup program Boot menu.

Table 4-5

Boot Menu

Field

Description

QuickBoot

QuickBoot involves skipping some

Mode

Power-On-Self-Test (POST) tasks, such as floppy

seek test and memory check. Howevery QAuickBoot

cannot skip ECC initialization.

If a chassis-intrusion was detected, an invalid CMOS

checksum was encountered, or there was a CMOS

battery failure, a full POST is performed regardless

of this setting. (CMOS is volatile memory powered by

a battery that contains data needed by the BIOS.)

Display

Allows the POST screen to display the Option ROM

Option ROM

messages. You should enable it when you install an

Messages

accessory board.

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HP Setup Program

Table 4-5

Boot Menu

Field

Description

Preferred

If you have two video cards, this field allows you to

Video

choose which one to use during boot.

Boot Device

Lets you select the device boot order.

Priority

58  Chapter 4

System BIOS and Resources

BIOS Beep Codes

BIOS Beep Codes

If a terminal error occurs during POST, the system issues a beep code before attempting to display the error in the upper left corner of the screen. Beep codes are useful for identifying the error when the system is unable to display the error message.

Beep Code

Numeric

Description

Code

1-2-2-3

16h

BIOS ROM checksum failure

1

B4h

one short beep before boot

1-3-1-1

20h

DRAM refresh test failure

1-2

98h

Video configuration failure or option ROMs

checksum failure

1-3-1-3

22h

8742 Keyboard controller test failure

1-3-3-1

28h

Memory initialization failure

1-3-4-1

2Ch

RAM failure on address line xxxxa

1-3-4-3

2Eh

RAM failure on data bits xxxx1 of low byte of

memory bus

2-1-2-3

46h

ROM copyright notice check failure

2-2-3-1

58h

Unexpected interrupts test failure

4-4-2-4

F7

Crisis Recovery Failure

a. If the BIOS detects error 2C or 2E (base 512K RAM error), it displays an additional word-bitmap (xxxx) indicating the address line or bits that failed. For example, “2C 0002” means address line 1 (bit one set) has failed. “2E 1020” means data bits 12 and 5 (bits 12 and 5 set) have failed in the lower 16 bits.

Chapter 4  59

System BIOS and Resources

System Resources

System Resources

System resources consist of:

“PCI IRQ Lines” on page 60
“IRQ Routing” on page 61
“System Memory Map” on page 65
“I/O Port Map (I/O Addresses Used by the System)” on page 65
“DMA Channel Controllers” on page 67
“Interrupt Controllers” on page 63

PCI IRQ Lines

PCI devices generate IRQs using up to four PCI IRQ lines (INTA#, INTB#, INTC#, and INTD#).

PCI interrupts can be shared; several devices can use the same interrupt. However, optimal system performance is reached when minimizing the sharing of interrupts. Refer to “Interrupt Controllers” on page 63 for a table of the PCI device interrupts.

60  Chapter 4

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System Resources

IRQ Routing

Figure 4-1 shows the IRQ graphical representation. Table 4-6 describes the routing shown in Figure 4-1.

Figure 4-1  IRQ Diagram

image21

Chapter 4  61

System BIOS and Resources

System Resources

Table 4-6

IRQ Routing Table

Device

Interrupt

ICH2 IRQ

P64H IRQ

AGP

A

A

AGP

B

B

PCI Slot 1

A

B

PCI Slot 1

B

C

PCI Slot 1

C

D

PCI Slot 1

D

E

PCI Slot 2

A

C

PCI Slot 2

B

D

PCI Slot 2

C

E

PCI Slot 2

D

F

PCI Slot 3

A

D

PCI Slot 3

B

E

PCI Slot 3

C

F

PCI Slot 3

D

G

PCI Slot 4

A

6

PCI Slot 4

B

7

PCI Slot 4

C

8

PCI Slot 4

D

9

PCI Slot 5

A

2

PCI Slot 5

B

3

PCI Slot 5

C

4

PCI Slot 5

D

5

P64H BT_INTR#

G

62  Chapter 4

System BIOS and Resources

System Resources

Table 4-6

IRQ Routing Table

Device

Interrupt

ICH2 IRQ

P64H IRQ

82550 LAN

A

F

53C1010R

A

H

53C1010R

B

D

Zircon

(All)

H

Interrupt Controllers

The system’s interrupt controller is equivalent in function to two 82C59 interrupt controllers. The following table shows how the interrupts are connected to the APIC controller. The IRQs are numbered sequentially, starting with the master controller and followed by the slave (both of 82C59 type).

I/O APIC Input

IRQ

IRQ Description

INTIN0

ICH

INTIN1

IRQ1

Super I/O keyboard controller

INTIN2

IRQ0

ICH system timer

INTIN3

IRQ3

Super I/O – Used by serial port if enabled

INTIN4

IRQ4

Super I/O – Used by serial port if enabled

INTIN5

IRQ5

Free if not used for parallel port or audio

INTIN6

IRQ6

Super I/O – floppy disk controller

INTIN7

IRQ7

Super I/O – LPT1

INTIN8

IRQ8

ICH – RTC

INTIN9

IRQ9

Available for PCI devices

INTIN10

IRQ10

Available for PCI devices

INTIN11

IRQ11

Available for PCI devices

INTIN12

IRQ12

Super I/O – mouse

INTIN13

IRQ13

Coprocessor

INTIN14

IRQ14

ICH – Integrated IDE Controller

(primary)

Chapter 4  63

System BIOS and Resources

System Resources

I/O APIC Input

IRQ

IRQ Description

INTIN15

IRQ15

ICH – Integrated IDE Controller

(secondary)

INTIN16

PCINTA

INTIN17

PCINTB

INTIN18

PCINTC

INTIN19

PCINTD

INTIN20

TFPC IRQ

INTIN21

SCI IRQ

INTIN22

not

connected

INTIN23

ICH SMI

(not used)

Three major interrupt modes are available:

PIC mode: This mode uses only legacy interrupt controllers, so the system can support only one processor. You can select this mode when you install Windows NT.
Virtual wire mode: This mode, which is implemented using the 82C59 interrupt and the I/O APIC controller, is used during boot time. The virtual wire mode allows the transition to the symmetric I/O mode. In the virtual wire mode, only one processor executes operations.
Symmetric I/O mode: This mode is implemented using the I/O APIC controller and allows for multiple processor operations.

NOTE

In PIC mode and virtual wire mode, PCI interrupts are routed to the INT

line. In symmetric I/O mode, PCI interrupts are routed to the I/O APIC

controllers and forwarded over an APIC bus to the processors.

64  Chapter 4

System BIOS and Resources

System Resources

System Memory Map

Reserved memory that accessory boards use must reside in the area from C8000h to EFFFFh.

0000 0000 – 0000 03FF

Real-mode IDT

0000 0400 – 0000 04FF

BIOS data area

0000 0500 – 0009 FC00

Used by operating system

0009 FC00 – 0009 FFFF

Extended BIOS data area

000A_0000 –

Video RAM or SMRAM (not visible

000B_FFFF

unless in SMM)

000C 0000 – 000C 7FFF

Video ROM (VGA ROM)

000C 8000 – 000F FFFF

Adapter ROM, RAM,

memory-mapped registers, BIOS

000E 0000-000F FFFF

128KB BIOS (Flash/Shadow)

0001 0000-000F FFFF

Memory (1MB to 16MB)

0010 0000-001F FFFF

Memory (16MB to 32MB)

0020 0000-003F FFFF

Memory (32MB to 64MB)

0040 0000-007F FFFF

Memory (64MB to 128MB)

0080 0000-FFFF FFFF

Memory (128MB to 4GB)

FECO 0000

I/O APIC

FEEO 0000

Local APIC (each CPU)

FFF8 0000-FFFF FFFF

512KB BIOS (Flash)

I/O Port Map (I/O Addresses Used by the System1)

You access peripheral devices, accessory devices, and system controllers through the system I/O space, which isn’t located in system memory space. The 64 KB of addressable I/O space comprises 8-bit and 16-bit registers (called I/O ports) located in the various system components. When you install an accessory board, ensure that the selected I/O

1. If configured.

Chapter 4  65

System BIOS and Resources

System Resources

address space is in the free area of the space reserved for accessory boards (100h to 3FFh).

Default Values for

Function

I/O Address Ports

0000

– 0CF7

DMA controller 1

0020

– 0021

Master interrupt controller (8259)

002E – 002F

Super I/O

0040

– 0043

Timer 1

0060, 0064

Keyboard controller (reset, slow A20)

0061

Port B (speaker, NMI status, and control)

0070

Bit 7: NMI mask register

0070

– 0071

RTC and CMOS

0080

Manufacturing port (POST card)

0081

– 0083, 008F

DMA low page register

0092

PS/2 reset and Fast A20

00A0 – 00A1

Slave interrupt controller

00C0 – 00DF

DMA controller 2

00F0 – 00FF

Coprocessor error

0170

– 0177

Free (IDE secondary channel)

01F0 – 01F7

IDE primary channel

0278

– 027F

LPT 2

02E8 – 02EF

Serial port 4 (COM4)

02F8 – 02FF

Serial port 2 (COM2)

0372

– 0377

Free (IDE secondary channel, secondary

floppy disk drive)

0378

– 037F

LPT1

03B0 – 03DF

VGA

03E8 – 03EF

COM3

03F0 – 03F5

Floppy disk drive controller

03F6

IDE primary channel

03F7

Floppy disk drive controller

03F8 – 03FF

COM1

04D0 – 04D1

Interrupt edge/level control

0778

– 077F

LPT1 ECP

0CF8 – 0CFF

PCI configuration space

66  Chapter 4

System BIOS and Resources

System Resources

Default Values for

Function

I/O Address Ports

C000

Power management I/O space and ACPI

registers

C100

– C10F

SMBus I/O space

DMA Channel Controllers

The system permits only I/O-to-memory and memory-to-I/O transfers. The hardware configuration doesn’t allow I/O-to-I/O or memory-to-memory transfers.

The system controller supports seven DMA channels, each with a page register that extends the channel’s addressing range to 16MB.

The following table shows how the system allocates DMA channels.

.

DMA controller

Channel

Function

DMA 0

Free

DMA 1

Free if not used for parallel port in Setup

DMA 2

Floppy disk drive controller

DMA 3

Free if not used for parallel port in Setup

DMA 4

Used to cascade DMA channels 0-3

DMA 5

Free

DMA 6

Free

DMA 7

Free

Chapter 4  67

System BIOS and Resources

System Resources

68  Chapter 4

5

Hardware Management

(Monitoring and Reporting)

Chapter 5  69

Hardware Management (Monitoring and Reporting)

Overview

Overview

This chapter contains the following topics:

“General Firmware Information” on page 71
“Hardware Monitoring” on page 72
“Reporting” on page 77
“Security” on page 79

70  Chapter 5

Hardware Management (Monitoring and Reporting) General Firmware Information

General Firmware Information

Firmware processing is provided by QLogic’s Zircon Lite chip and an auxiliary Winbond chip. The firmware implements industry standard IPMI Specification 1.0 with the following extensions:

BIOS configuration tokens
Additional hardware control
BIOS security

KCS 1 and BT protocols are supported. Only KCS 1 is used during BIOS POST. BT is supported at run-time (after the operating system boots).

Date/Time Initialization

The Zircon Lite’s date and time is initialized after each power-on by the BIOS. This enables accurate logging of timestamp information for events in the SEL.

SEEPROM Organization

There are three Atmel SEEPROMs attached to the main SMBUS for information storage. These contain the SEL, FRU, and HP NBA Tokens. The FRU stores the product model, serial number, and other chassis and system board information.

Chapter 5  71

Hardware Management (Monitoring and Reporting)

Hardware Monitoring

Hardware Monitoring

Built-in Self Test (BIST)

Zircon Lite does a BIST after resetting and displays the result on the Diag LEDs (see “Understanding the Diag LEDs” on page 212) if an error occurs. The following items are checked:

Accessibility of SEL device
Accessibility of FRU device
Accessibility of SDR Repository (read only)
Viability of Hardware Management Controller (HMC) firmware (firmware corrupt)
HMC hardware problem (general HMC failure)

Sensor Scan

Voltages, temperatures, fan tachometers, processor-related items, and chassis intrusion are scanned.

Voltages

Pin 10 of Winbond W83782D is be used as a 2.5 V reference. This voltage is used to calibrate all of the voltage readings in Table 5-1.

Table 5-1

Voltage Scan

Sensor

Sensor

Signal

Approx.

Mid

Approx.

Zircon

Winbond

Description

#

ID

Lower

Upper

Pin

Pin

Limit

Limit

20h

+12VIO

+12VIO

10.7V

12V

13.2V

9

12V Supply for

non-VRM

21h

+3.3VSB

3.3VSB

3.05V

3.3V

3.55V

35

3.3V Standby

22h

+2.5V

2.5V

2.3V

2.5V

2.7V

7

2.5V RDRAM

Supply

72  Chapter 5

Hardware Management (Monitoring and Reporting) Hardware Monitoring

Table 5-1

Voltage Scan

Sensor

Sensor

Signal

Approx.

Mid

Approx.

Zircon

Winbond

Description

#

ID

Lower

Upper

Pin

Pin

Limit

Limit

23h

VDDQ

VDDQ

1.4V

1.5V

1.6V

5

AGP Termination

Voltage

24h

+1.8VSB

SB1_8

1.65V

1.8V

1.95V

4

1.8V Standby

25h

+1.8V

P1_8V

1.65V

1.8V

1.95V

3

1.8V Supply

26h

VCC_

VCC_

1.1V

1.65V

1.9V

36

Processor Core

CORE

CORE

Voltage

27h

+3.3V

+3_3V

3.05V

3.3V

3.55V

34

3.3V Supply

28h

+5V

+5V

4.15V

5V

5.6V

33

5V Supply

29h

+12V

+12V

13.7V

12V

12.95V

32

12V Supply

2Ah

-12V

-12V

-11.15V

-12V

-10.3V

31

-12V Supply

2Bh

VBAT

VBAT

2.7V

3.2V

3.6V

30

Battery Voltage

2Ch

+5VSB

5VSB

4.65V

5V

5.35V

29

5V Standby

Temperatures

Table 5-2

Temperature Scan

Sensor

Sensor

Signal

Lower

Mid

Upper

Zircon

Winbond

Description

#

ID

Limit

Limit

Pin

Pin

42h

EXT

EXT1_

2C

28C

38C

Pin 40

Ambient air temp

TEMP

TEMP

Chapter 5  73

Hardware Management (Monitoring and Reporting)

Hardware Monitoring

Fan Speed and Control

Fan tach speeds are given in revolutions per second. Multiply by 60 for

rpm.

Table 5-3

Fan and Speed Control Scan

Sensor

Sensor

Signal

Lower

Mid

Upper

Zircon

Winbond

Description

#

ID

Limit

Limit

Pin

Pin

51h

CPU0FA

P1FAN

15

65

120

Pin 20

Fan #1: Processor

NTACH

TACH

1 fan tach

52h

CPU1FA

P2FAN

15

65

120

Pin 19

Fan #2: Processor

NTACH

TACH

2 fan tach

53h

SYSFAN

FAN1T

10

29

60

Pin 18

Fan #3: System

TACH

ACH

fan tach

54h

PCIFAN

FAN4T

10

31

60

GPIO 0

Fan #4: PCI fan

TACH

ACH

tach

55h

HDDFA

FAN5T

15

28

80

GPIO 1

Fan #5: HDD fan

NTACH

ACH

tach

56h

PSUFAN

FANM

10

51

100

GPIO 3

Fan #6: Power

TACH

supply fan tach

61h

CPU0FA

WP1FA

Pin 23

Fan #1: Processor

NCTRL

NCTL

1 fan ctrl

62h

CPU1FA

WP2FA

Pin 11

Fan #2: Processor

NCTRL

NCTL

2 fan ctrl

63h

SYSFAN

WFAN1

Pin 10

Fan #3: System

PWM

23CTL

fan PWM (&

unused spare fan

PWM)

64h

PCIFAN

FAN4C

GPIO21

Fan #4: PCI fan

PWM

TL

PWM1

PWM

65h

HDDFA

FAN5C

GPIO20

Fan #5: HDD fan

NPWM

TL

PWM0

PWM

74  Chapter 5

Hardware Management (Monitoring and Reporting) Hardware Monitoring

Additional Sensors

The SDR for Processor 0 includes three separate functions:

presence detect
IERR
processor voltage mismatch

Table 5-4

Additional Sensor Scans

Sensor

Sensor ID

Signal

Sensor

Zircon

Winbon

Description

#

Type

Pin

d Pin

70h

CPU0

SKTOCC_0_L

Processor

GPIO23

Processor 0

PRESENT

Presence/Absence

71h

CPU1

SKTOCC_1_L

Processor

GPIO24

Processor 1

PRESENT

Presence/Absence

72h

CPU0IERR

IERR#

Processor

GPIO27

Processor 0 IERR

73h

CPU

VID_ERROR#

Processor

GPIO28

Processor Voltage

MISMATCH

Mismatch

80h

CHASSIS

INTRU#

Chassis

C_OPEN

General Chassis

OPEN

Intrusion

Intrusion

Fan Control

Individual fan speed is controlled by the HMC, based on temperature and configuration information. This allows fans to run slower in most circumstances, thus making the machine quieter.

Sense Power State

Zircon senses power state using signal pins from the ICH2.

This is used for fan control and indicating power state on the status LED.

Chapter 5  75

Hardware Management (Monitoring and Reporting)

Hardware Monitoring

Chassis Intrusion

Chassis intrusion is detected via the Winbond W83782D C_OPEN pin.

There is an SDR (sensor data record) for the chassis intrusion event.

If the hardware indicates an intrusion, the HMC clears the hardware latch in the Winbond, logs the event in the System Event Log (SEL), which is non-volatile storage, and sets the state of the NBA token for chassis intrusion based on the current chassis intrusion status.

The BIOS queries the NBA token to determine if it should display a chassis intrusion message. It then clears the chassis intrusion status in the NBA token.

Applications such as TopTools query for a chassis intrusion event by searching the SEL.

Pre-boot Device Test

The HMC detects presence of processors. The BIOS detects presence of memory and memory errors. If it is a condition that prevents the BIOS from completing POST, it notifies the HMC so that the HMC can display error LEDs on the front panel.

PCI/AGP Power

The BIOS detects presence and power consumption of PCI/AGP devices plugged in the system. It then passes this information on to the HMC, to detect overpower situations and to know whether it’s possible to turn off the PCI fan to make the system quieter.

76  Chapter 5

Hardware Management (Monitoring and Reporting) Reporting

Reporting

Event Logging

Hardware monitoring errors, detected by the Hardware Management Controller, are logged to the SEL (System Event Log). External agents, such as the BIOS, can ask the Hardware Management Controller to log errors on their behalf.

Sensor Report Using IPMI

Sensor information is available using the standard IPMI command, Get Sensor Reading. The optional Sensor Device commands are not supported by the HMC firmware. Dynamic setting of sensor thresholds is not supported.

System Event Log (SEL)

Events are logged in the SEL using the standard SEL Event Record format as defined in the IPMI spec, section 19.1. OEM SEL records are also supported. The following SEL device commands are supported as specified in section 18.1 of the IPMI spec:

Get SEL Info
Get SEL Entry
Add SEL Entry
Clear SEL
Get SEL Time
Set SEL Time
Reserve SEL

Power Status LED

The Power Status LED indicates the state of the system. See “HP x4000 Control Panel” on page 21. Error info has priority over power state info, when the computer is on.

Chapter 5  77

Hardware Management (Monitoring and Reporting)

Reporting

Diag LEDs

When a sensor indicates an error, the corresponding LED is turned on.

See “Understanding the Diag LEDs” on page 212.

In general, auto re-arm is used for sensors. That is, if a sensor threshold has been exceeded and the error is displayed on the LEDs, once the sensor drops below the threshold, the sensor is automatically re-armed so that if its reading rises up above the threshold again, it triggers another error. Each of these errors is also logged in the SEL.

Firmware Failure Handling

The boot code checks for a valid firmware runtime image and displays a Diag LED code if it is not valid.

BIOS is Running OK

The HMC detects if the BIOS is running OK and displays a Diag LED code if the BIOS does not provide a message.

IPMI Platform Event Trap

The firmware sends a platform event as an SNMP trap, using IPMI Platform Event Trap Specification version 1.0.

78  Chapter 5

Hardware Management (Monitoring and Reporting) Security

Security

Lock Status Panel

The HMC can lock out the front panel, when necessary, to prevent the user from pressing the power button or the reset button at an inopportune time (while the firmware flash update is in process). The BIOS also has this capability. This is because there are two separate flash update utilities: one to update the BIOS flash device, and another to update the HMC flash device. The BIOS and firmware flash utilities utilities are packaged together in the BIOS/firmware flash update package at www.hp.com/workstations/support.

BIOS Configuration Tokens

Some CMOS tokens are backed up to NVRAM (serial eeprom). They can be modified by TopTools, and the BIOS is in charge of synchronization.

Once the system has booted, a valid password must be entered to access tokens, provided that passwords have been set in the Setup program. User and administrator passwords give different rights.

Chapter 5  79

Hardware Management (Monitoring and Reporting)

Security

80  Chapter 5

6  Power Specifications

Chapter 6  81

Power Specifications

Power Delivery

Power Delivery

Figure 6-1 shows a block diagram of the overall power generation. Table 6-1 has a description of the signals given in Figure 6-1.

Figure 6-1  Power Generation Diagram

image22

82  Chapter 6

Power Specifications

Power Delivery

Table 6-1

Power Signal Description

Supply

Description

12 VDIG

Supplies power to the dc-to-dc converter that delivers

power to the processor(s).

12 VIO

Supplies power to:

fans

hard disk drive(s)

floppy disk drive

PCI slots

• AGP Pro 110 4X

-12 V

Supplies power to:

• AGP Pro 110 4X

PCI

serial port

3.3 V

Supplies power to:

• Memory Expander Card (MEC)

• Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) slots

• Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP Pro 110 4X)

• Intel 860 chip set

audio

SCSI

1.5 circuit

5 V

Supplies power to:

hard disk drive(s)

floppy disk drive

PCI slots

• AGP Pro 110 4X

• 1.8 V switching regulator circuit

• MEC 2.5 V Voltage Regulator Module (VRM)

Chapter 6  83

Power Specifications

Power Delivery

Table 6-1

Power Signal Description

Supply

Description

5 V Standby

Supplies power to:

Diag LEDs

Network activity LED

• Hard disk drive activity LED

Power LED

• Local Area Network (LAN) connector

• Universal Serial Bus (USB) connector

PS2KB

• Winbond WB782D hardware monitoring ASIC

3.3 VSB

SB1_8V

VCC_CORE

The exact processor voltage is determined by VID

bits from the processor(s).

In a dual-processor system, the processors share a

power plane. A single VCC_CORE is generated by a

+12 VDIG to VCC_CORE dc-to-dc converter that is

placed on the system board. This is called VR down.

The maximum current each processor can draw is

57 A.

1.5 V

This 1.5 V supply is generated from a three terminal

regulator on the system board. The current is limited

to 5 A.

1.8 V

This supply is used for the Intel 860 Memory

Controller Hub, the P64H, and the MEC. It is

generated by a switching dc-to-dc converter. the

output voltage is 1.8 V and the output current is

limited to 15 A.

A separate 1.8 V power supply is used for the ICH2.

This 1.8 V supply is generated from a three terminal

linear regulator which limits the output current to

1 A.

2.5 V

This supply is generated by a voltage regulator on

the Memory Expander Card (MEC).

84  Chapter 6

Power Specifications

Power Delivery

Table 6-1

Power Signal Description

Supply

Description

3.3 V Standby

This supply is derived from the 5 VSB with a 1 A

three terminal regulator. It is used by the LAN and

the Intel 860 ICH2.

1.8 V Standby

This supply is derived from the 5 VSB with a 1 A

three terminal regulator. It is used by the Intel 860

ICH2.

Chapter 6  85

Power Specifications

Power Supply

Power Supply

Table 6-2 shows the voltage and current specifications for the power supplies. Total continuous output power does not exceed 465W.

Table 6-2

Voltage and Current Specification

+3.3 V

+5 V

+12 VDIG

+12 VIO

-12 V

+5 VSB

Voltage: Max

3.14 V

4.5 V

11.4 V

11.4 V

-10.8 V

4.75 V

Min

3.46 V

5.25 V

12.6 V

12.6 V

-13.2 V

5.25 V

Current: Max

40 A

27 A

22 A

17 A

-0.55 A

1.5 A

Min

4.0 A

1.0 A

0.0 A

1.0 A

0.0 A

0.0 A

86  Chapter 6

Power Specifications

Power Supply

Power Supply Specifications

Parameter

Total Rating

Maximum

Maximum for AGP Pro 110 4X Slot

PCI Slots

Connector

Extension

Total

Input voltage

100V,5A

and current

120 V, 4.2 A

200 V, 2.5 A to

240 V, 2.1 A

Input

50 to 60 Hz

frequency

Available

465 W

80W

AGP Pro 50, 50W

power

45W

AGP Pro 110, 110W

Max current at

12 Aa

0.5 A

1 A

9.2 A

10.2 A

+12 VIO

Max current at

22 A

+12 VCPU

Max current at

0.55 A

0.1 A

-12 V

Max current at

40 Aa

7.6 A

6 A

7.6 A

13.6 A

+3.3 V

Max current at

27 Aa

5 A

2 A

+5 V

Max current at

2 A

+5 V stdby

a.The system can draw a maximum of 110 W from the AGP Pro 110 4X slot. Total combined output power on +3.3 V and +5 V shall not exceed 250 W. Total combined output current on +12 VCPU and +12 VIO shall not exceed 27.6 A nominal.

Chapter 6  87

Power Specifications

Power Supply

Resetting the Power Supply

If an overload triggers the power supply’s overload protection, all power is immediately cut. To reset the power supply unit:

1.Disconnect the power cord.
2.Determine what caused the overload, and fix the problem.
3.Reconnect the power cord, and reboot the workstation.

When you power down the Workstation through the operating system, power consumption falls below the low power consumption (refer to the table on page 88), but doesn’t reach zero. This on/off feature extends the power supply’s lifetime.

Power Consumption and Cooling

The power consumption and acoustics listed in the following table are valid for a typical maximum configuration:

two processors
768 MB memory
two hard disk drives
DVD ROM
3.5-inch floppy disk drive
graphics card

All information in this section is based on primary power consumptions.

Input power consumption (approximate

230V/50Hz and

values)

115V/60Hz

• Typical operating mode

360 W

1228.4 Btu/ha

• Standby mode (Windows 2000 only)

150 W

511.8 Btu/h

• Hibernate mode (Windows 2000 only)

<11W

< 37.33 Btu/h

a. 1 W = 3.4121Btu/h

88  Chapter 6

NOTE

Power Specifications

Power Saving and Ergonometry

Power Saving and Ergonometry

Depending on the operating system, the following power management modes are available:

Full on (S0)
Standby (S1)
Hibernate (S4)
Full off (S5)

Windows NT 4.0 does not support S1 or S4.

Using Power Management

Power management lets you reduce the Workstation’s overall power consumption by slowing down the Workstation’s activity when it is idle.

Operating systems differ in their power management capabilities. In Windows 2000, you can select from two power management modes:

Stand By (S1) is a low power state where the processor is shut off, but memory remains powered. Waking up the Workstation from Stand By mode is faster than from Hibernate mode because the RAM contents do not need to be restored. However, when the Workstation is in Stand By mode, it consumes more power than Hibernate mode because the memory remains powered.
Hibernate (S4) makes the machine look and behave like it is off except that it remembers the state it was in before hibernation and can be awakened without a full operating system boot. This is because the operating system copies the RAM contents out to a special location on the hard disk before entering hibernation.

You must enable Hibernate mode through Power Options in the Control Panel before it can be a shut down option.

Chapter 6  89

Power Specifications

Power Saving and Ergonometry

To change your power management settings in Windows 2000:

1.Select Start > Settings > Control Panel.
2.Double click on Power Options.

For more information on changing your power options, refer to your Windows 2000 documentation.

Power Saving Modes and Resume Events

Full On

Standby

Hibernate

Full Off

(S0)

(S1)

(S4)

(S5)

Processor

Normal

Halted

Off

Off

speed

Display

On

Blanked

Off

Off

Hard Disk

Normal

Halted

Off

Off

Drive

speed

Active Power

VCC

VCC

VCCAux

VCCAux

Planes

VCCAux

VCCAux

Power

<500W

<150W

<11W

<11W

Consumption

Resume

Power button,

Power button,

Power

Events

LANa,

LAN,

button

Modem,

Modem,

USB,

Scheduler,

Real Time

Keyboard

Clockb,

Keyboard

Resume

10-20

BIOS boot

Regular

Delay

seconds

delay

boot

delay

a. Wake-on-LAN is generated by a PME# signal. PME initialization is compliant with PCI Power Management 1.1. Specification chapter 8.8.

b. The RealTIme Clock wake-up can be used, provided you have software that can configure it.

90  Chapter 6

Power Specifications

Power Saving and Ergonometry

Chapter 6  91

Power Specifications

Power Saving and Ergonometry

92  Chapter 6

7  Connector Pin-Outs

Chapter 7  93

Connector Pin-Outs

Expansion Slots

Expansion Slots

Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) Slots

Table 7-1 describes the PCI 33 MHz, 32-bit connector. Table 7-2 describes the PCI 66 MHz, 64-bit connector.

Table 7-1

PCI 33 MHz, 32-bit Connector

Pin

Signal

Pin

Signal

Slot #1

Slot #2

Slot #3

Slot #1

Slot #2

Slot #3

(J4B1)

(J3B1)

(J2B2)

(J4B1)

(J3B1)

9J2B2)

A1

PTRST#

A32

AD16

A2

+12VIO

A33

+3_3V

A3

PTMS

A34

FRAME#

A4

PTDI

A35

GND

A5

+5V

A36

TRDY#

A6

PIRQB#

A37

GND

A37

GND

A7

PIRQD#

A38

STOP#

A38

STOP#

A8

+5V

A39

+3_3V

A9

NC

A40

NC

A10

+5V

A41

NC

A11

NC

A42

NC

A12

GND

A43

PAR

A13

GND

A44

AD15

A14

3.3VSB

A45

+3_3V

A15

1PCIRST#

A46

AD13

94  Chapter 7

Connector Pin-Outs

Expansion Slots

Table 7-1

PCI 33 MHz, 32-bit Connector

Pin

Signal

Pin

Signal

Slot #1

Slot #2

Slot #3

Slot #1

Slot #2

Slot #3

(J4B1)

(J3B1)

(J2B2)

(J4B1)

(J3B1)

9J2B2)

A16

+5V

A47

AD11

A17

PGNT1#

A48

GND

A48

GND

A18

GND

A49

AD9

A19

PCIPME#

A50

Key

A20

AD30

A51

Key

A21

+3_3V

A52

CBE0#

A22

AD28

A53

+3_3V

A23

AD26

A54

AD6

A24

GND

A55

AD4

A25

AD24

A56

GND

A26

AD26R

A57

AD2

A57

AD2

A27

+3_3V

A58

AD0

A28

AD22

A59

+5V

A29

AD20

A60

REQ64B#

REQ64C#

REQ64A#

A30

GND

A61

+5V

A31

AD18

A62

+5V

B1

-12V

B32

AD17

B2

PTCK

B33

CBE2#

B3

GND

B34

GND

B4

NC

B35

IRDY#

B5

+5V

B36

+3_3V

Chapter 7  95

Connector Pin-Outs

Expansion Slots

Table 7-1

PCI 33 MHz, 32-bit Connector

Pin

Signal

Pin

Signal

Slot #1

Slot #2

Slot #3

Slot #1

Slot #2

Slot #3

(J4B1)

(J3B1)

(J2B2)

(J4B1)

(J3B1)

9J2B2)